NJ Bankruptcy Attorneys and Loan Modification Lawyers Help Those in Financial Distress

In these tough economic times, nearly anyone could fall into financial hardship. Regardless of the circumstances surrounding a person’s situation, financial obligations do not let up. Very easily, a person can feel too far behind to ever catch up.

Whether medical problems, extended unemployment, or other unforeseen circumstances are the cause of financial distress, loan modification lawyers can help. Loan modification lawyers can work with creditors to renegotiate the terms of a loan.

While loan modification lawyers in NJ may work in the same practice as bankruptcy attorneys, but generally have a different emphasis. Normally, loan modification lawyers seek to prevent bankruptcy or foreclosure.

Loan modification lawyers know that creditors, especially the holder of a home mortgage, want to avoid the bankruptcy and foreclosure process. If a NJ bank has to foreclose on a property and work with bankruptcy lawyers, they will lose a lot of money.

NJ bankruptcy lawyers and NJ bankruptcy attorneys know that the foreclosure process itself is very expensive, so most banks would like to avoid it if at all possible. Loan modification lawyers help take advantage of this fact to negotiate loan conditions that allow the client to meet payments.

Loan modification lawyers can help a client ask for smaller payments spread over a longer time, or for a lower interest rate. Taking this step can keep a client and family in their home, and can be a responsible step to take at the earlier stages of financial distress.

NJ bankruptcy attorneys can help clients if loan modification offers are rejected or were not sufficient to alleviate financial distress. If a person simply cannot meet his or her financial obligations, NJ bankruptcy attorneys can serve as guides through the bankruptcy process.

Like the loan modification experts, NJ bankruptcy attorneys can work to keep families in their homes. NJ bankruptcy lawyers, however, must work within the court system to meet this goal. Once in court, a judge must approve the NJ bankruptcy lawyer’s plan to pay debtors.

NJ bankruptcy lawyers can ask for different arrangements, depending on circumstances. They can request that payments be adjusted, or that debt be absolved with the sale of the property.

Unfortunately, without NJ bankruptcy attorneys or NJ bankruptcy lawyers, the process can be very complicated. NJ bankruptcy lawyers specialize in this legal area, and can simplify and explain all options and proceedings. Clients also appreciate NJ bankruptcy attorneys’ assistance with completing and submitting paperwork.

About Us:

At the Law Offices of Kasuri & Levy, LLC, we have over 45 years of experience. Our loan modification lawyers have an outstanding reputation, and are known for handling complex matters with a comforting and personalized touch. We focus on providing quality service to each client, rather than handling client matters with quantity in mind. Learn more at www.kasuriandlevy.com.

Tax Tips for New Ecommerce Entrepreneurs

New ecommerce entrepreneurs can find them confused and confounded by the tax and accounting requirements of their venture. And thats a shame: If someones spotted a great new category and successfully built a web presence, heck, that someone shouldnt find themselves bogged down with the accounting minutia. The entrepreneur should focus on increasing traffic, expanding margins, and growing cash profits.

With that in mind, I offer up the following tax and accounting tips:

Tip #1: Dont Incorporate

A true corporationwhether a C corporation or an S corporationsaddles your business with more complicated tax accounting and a bunch of state filing requirements. You dont want to deal with this redtapeor at least not until youre profitable.

Instead, operate your business as a sole proprietorship. If youre concerned about legal liability protection, note that you can setup a one-owner limited liability company, or LLC. A one owner LLC is treated as a sole proprietorship for income tax purposes.

Tip #2: Start Your Business Before Making Investments

Expenditures you make before youre actually in business-in other words, before youve got a business license and before youre selling or trying to sell your stuffarent very deductible.

Specifically, you can probably deduct the first $5,000 of these expenses. But any amounts in excess of the $5,000 must be amortized over the next fifteen years.

What this means is that you want to start your business before you start spending money on advertising, training, web development, accountants and lawyers and so on.

Tip #3: Automate Your Bookkeeping & Accounting

By lawand some people dont know thisyoure required to maintain an accounting system that lets you clearly measure your income. As a practical matter, this means you need to use a product like Quicken or QuickBooks.

But you ought to go one better than simply using desktop accounting software. Make sure that youre taking advantage of online banking and bill payment features which integrate your accounting system with your banking. As much as is possible, for example, you want to be able to move money from PayPal to your bank to QuickBooks simply by typing a few keys or clicking your mouse a few times.

Tip #4: Hire a Payroll Service Before Hiring Employees

Many successful ecommerce business owners can run their operations without employees. And if thats true for you, hey, congratulations. If and when you do need employees, however, dont try to handle the payroll yourself. Oursource the payroll to one of the large payroll service bureaus like ADP, Payroll, or QuickBooks.

These services are expensive. Figure $1000 to $2000 per year. But the services let you avoid the bookkeeping nightmare called payroll and prevent you from getting into payroll tax trouble.

Tip #5: Consider S Corporation Status After Youre Profitable

Ive written and talked much about how S corporations save taxpayers money and how the right way to set up an S corporation is first create a limited liability company and then ask the IRS to treat the LLC as an S corporation for tax purposes.